Jan 09 - Feb 09 - Mar 09 - Apr 09 - May 09 - Jun 09 - Jul 09 - Aug 09 - Sep 09 - Oct 09 - Nov 09 - Dec 09

Jan 10 - Feb 10 - Mar 10 - Apr 10 - May 10 - Jun 10 - Jul 10 - Aug 10 - Sep 10 - Oct 10 - Nov 10 - Dec 10

Jan 11 - Feb 11 - Mar 11 - Apr 11 - May 11 - Jun 11 - Jul 11 - Aug 11 - Sep 11 - Oct 11 - Nov 11 - Dec 11

This issue is not yet ready for purchase so please consider one of these Specials,
or please email us to express your interest in this or any other edition of Aero Pioneer Times

Sample of December 1910 News

More than 100 actual news stories appear in the December 1910 issue. Below is a sampling of a few days of 1910. Individual editions are $9.95 plus postage.


Grahame-White, Miss Chase
Fellow Passenegers on Maurentania - The Aviator Sued by Wrights

     New York, NY. Dec 1, 1910 - Claude Grahame-White, the English aviator, and Miss Pauline Chase, the actress, to whom he has been reported engaged, were passengers on the steamship Maurentania when she sailed yesterday morning. Both Mr. Grahame-White and Miss Chase smiled when questioned in regard to the engagement and made no statement one way or the other. Miss Chase's press representative announced the engagement some time ago, but Sidney MacDonald, business manager for Grahame-White, said the story wasn't true.
     Although the Englishman is said to have carried away more than $100,000 earned on this side, he left ruffled over the fact that on the eve of his departure he was served papers ordering him to appear in the United States Circuit Court on January 2 to answer a complaint brought by the Wright brothers, alleging infringements on their patent.
     Clifford B. Harmon of the Aero Club of America also sailed on the Maurentania. He said he was going to study aeronautical conditions in Europe.
Source: The Sun, New York

Miss Sears Orders a Biplane
Boston Society Girl and Athlete to Have Flyer of Her Own

     Boston, Mass. Dec 3, 1910 - Miss Eleanor Sears, who has made several aeroplane flights with Claude Grahame-White, has ordered a biplane from a Marblehead firm.
Source: The Sun, New York

Ragan Flies At Hempstead Plains

     New York, NY Dec. 4, 1910 - In a Curtiss biplane Harry Ragan made short flights at the Hempstead Plains aviation field yesterday afternoon. He completed a circle of the course at a height of almost forty feet. Henry Ragot, a sixteen year old inventor, will try out his monoplane this afternoon.
Source: The Sun, New York

Aviator Hamilton Sued for $5,500

     New York, NY - Dec. 4, 1910 - A suit for $5,500 damages against Charles K. Hamilton, the aviator, was filed in the Supreme Court yesterday by John H. Davis, who says Hamilton failed to deliver a certain motor to be installed in a monoplane, as a result of which Davis could not give exhibitions he had planned. Of the amount sued for $500 was paid on account, he said.
Source: The Sun, New York

Wireless In Flight
Farman Hovering in the Air Communicates Readily With Terra Firma

     Paris, Dec. 19, 1910 - Maurice Farman, carrying a wireless apparatus on board his biplane, hovered over Buc for more than an hour to-day and transmitted distinct messages to Versailles and other points more than fifteen miles distant.
     The Government has ordered the aeroplane corps to hasten carrying out experiments in this line.
Source: The Sun, New York

Hoxsey Wins Height Record
Climbs Up 11,474 Feet In A Wright Biplane
Attains Altitude Nearly a Thousand Feet Greater Than That Made By Legagneux at Pau on December 9 - Faced Stiff Wind and Was Nearly Frozen

     Los Angeles, Cal. - Dec. 26, 1910 - Arch Hoxsey in a Wright biplane to-day climbed to the height of 11,474 feet, breaking the record made by Legagneux, who attained a height of 10, 499 feet at Pau, France, on December 9.
     No fewer than 50,000 persons saw the early start of Hoxsey's climb. Long before he reached the point he ceased to point the planes upward he had been lost to sight.
     When he returned to earth and left his machine he was lifted to the shoulders of his admirers and carried about, while the cheers from the grand stands rolled across Dominguez Field.
     Hoxsey's feat was all the more remarkable because he went into the air at a time when several aviators feared to brave the high wind that was blowing. Ely was forced to descend after circling the course a few times and Latham plunged fifty feet to the ground, wrecking his Antoinette.
     Hoxsey could not speak when he landed. He seemed unable to hear and said later that he scarcely did hear the cheering that began when a white flag was run up as a signal that the world's record had been broken.
     Benumbed, speechless and dazed, gasping for breath and blue from the cold of the upper air, Hoxsey was in no condition to respond to the ovation.
     "It was cold up there. God, but it was cold." Said Hoxsey when he had thawed out and regained his speech.
     Then he pleaded with his excited admirers to keep together and go in one direction if they were determined to carry him.
     Hoxsey said that he had decided to quit climbing when he realized he was in great danger of being frozen.
     He had been out of sight an hour and fearing that he was lost his associates began sending word to nearby points to watch for him when he reappeared on his way back to earth.
     Soon he landed and a rush was made to read the barograph, which recorded the loftiest point he had reached.
     P.O. Parmalee later reached an altitude of more than 6,000 feet. Sam Perkins with his man lifting kites gave an exhibition. James Radley, the English aviator, would not go into the air with his Bleriot in the thirty mile an hour wind that blew a good part of the afternoon.
     Hubert Latham fell fifty feet with his Antoinette at 3 o'clock this afternoon while trying to effect a landing in a high wind.
     He remained in the air as long as he could, realizing that it would be difficult to land, and made the attempt only when his gasolene was running low.
     As he swooped downward a gust of wind hit the planes. Latham tried to bring its head up into the wind, but the downward pressure of the air swept it into a barbed wire fence and overturned it.
     Both blades of the propeller were broken and the left wing and the tail were smashed. Latham escaped injury.
Source: The Sun, New York


More than 100 actual news stories appear in the December 1910 issue. Above is a sampling of a few days of 1910. Individual editions are $9.95 plus postage.

News Samples

Jan 09 - Feb 09 - Mar 09 - Apr 09 - May 09 - Jun 09 - Jul 09 - Aug 09 - Sep 09 - Oct 09 - Nov 09 - Dec 09

Jan 10 - Feb 10 - Mar 10 - Apr 10 - May 10 - Jun 10 - Jul 10 - Aug 10 - Sep 10 - Oct 10 - Nov 10 - Dec 10

Jan 11 - Feb 11 - Mar 11 - Apr 11 - May 11 - Jun 11 - Jul 11 - Aug 11 - Sep 11 - Oct 11 - Nov 11 - Dec 11