Jan 09 - Feb 09 - Mar 09 - Apr 09 - May 09 - Jun 09 - Jul 09 - Aug 09 - Sep 09 - Oct 09 - Nov 09 - Dec 09

Jan 10 - Feb 10 - Mar 10 - Apr 10 - May 10 - Jun 10 - Jul 10 - Aug 10 - Sep 10 - Oct 10 - Nov 10 - Dec 10

Jan 11 - Feb 11 - Mar 11 - Apr 11 - May 11 - Jun 11 - Jul 11 - Aug 11 - Sep 11 - Oct 11 - Nov 11 - Dec 11

Sample of February 1911 News
More than 100 actual news stories appear in the February 1911 issue. Below is a sampling of a few days during February 1911. Individual editions are $9.95 plus postage.

Pre-Order February 1911 Edition and receive 50% off the March 1911 Edition and save shipping costs on that 2nd issue.


HAVANA FLIGHT STUNTS
Ward Volplanes to Safety With Broken Propeller - Beachey Drops Bombs

     Havana, Cuba, February 2, 1911 - Despite a strong gusty wind McCurdy, Beachey and Ward made good flights at the aviation meeting here to-day. On Ward's second flight something flew off the engine and struck the propeller, shattering it.
     Ward instantly stopped the engine and volplaned at a steep angle alighting safely.
     Beachey at a height of 300 feet threw two bombs at a target, hitting it with both.
Source: New York City, The Sun

SAN ANTONIO PRESS CLUB'S AVIATION MEET OPENED

     San Antonio, Texas, February 2, 1911 - The opening day of the San Antonio Press Club's aviation meet was featured by a fifteen mile cross country flight by Rene Simon, and a race between Roland G. Garros in his monoplane and an automobile. Garros flew at a speed of sixty miles an hour, and easily won from the automobile. Charles K. Hamilton attained an altitude of 1,000 feet in his Curtiss biplane. At one time there were three machines in the air.
     Among the keenest spectators was a delegation of army officers from Fort Sam Houston. They waxed enthusiastic over the possibilities of the aeroplane in future warfare.
Source: Jacksonville Florida Times-Union

HERR JOSEPH BRUCKER HAS BALLOON READY FOR TRANS-ATLANTIC ATTEMPT

     Kiel, Germany, February 17, 1911 - The new dirigible balloon Suchard, in which Herr Joseph Brucker will attempt a transatlantic voyage, was christened by Princess Henry of Prussia. A bottle of liquid air was broken. The ceremony was witnessed by a notable gathering, which included Prince Henry.
     Herr Brucker plans to cross the ocean from the Cape Verde Islands to Barbados or Trinidad some time in March or April.
     The balloon Suchard is 60 metres long and 17 metres at its largest diameter and will contain more than nine thousand cubic metres of hydrogen. The autoboat which will be suspended from the gas bag is 10 metres long, three metres wide and about two metres in depth. Two 100-horse power motors will drive two 50-horse power propellers.
Source: Worcester Massachusetts Evening Gazette

AVIATORS IN TAMPA FLY IN HIGH WIND
Few Spectators Delighted With Daring of Beachey
Raced Automobile Into Submission and Made Several Spectacular Flights

     Tampa, Florida, february 21, 1911 - The second day of the Tampa Times aviation meet at the West Tampa track was marred by bad weather, fairly high winds, accompanied by a misty rain, which had a deterrent effect upon the attendance. It was generally believed the aviators would not attempt flights. The wind going down, Beachey decided to make a try, and he gave a fine exhibition of airmanship. Then McCurdy made a short flight, but as his engine was not working smoothly he soon alighted.
     He narrowly escaped disaster on alighting on the infield, a small log lying in the path of his racer. The front wheel of the running gear hit the log and was bent. The aviator was not unseated, as the aeroplane remained upright.
     The main event was the race between an automobile and an aeroplane. A Ford runabout car, driven by C.A. Vanduzer was to have made a five mile race against the aeroplane. The track, however, was heavy and bad, after the races and after going a mile, and narrowly escaping a spill at the turn, Vanduzer gave up. He made his one mile in one minute and 45 seconds, but Beachey in his aeroplane made the distance in 1 minute 4 and 1-5 seconds, and could easily have beaten the auto at any distance. The big biplane took the curves of the track with ease, and the crowd marveled at Beacheys skilful handling of the airship.
Source: Jacksonville Florida Times-Union

LIEUT. FOULOIS FIRST REAL MILITARY AIRSHIP SCOUT
Soaring About on Mexican Border to Preserve U.S. Rights from Troops Engaged in Revolution

     Worcester, Massachusetts, February 28, 1911 - Lieutenant Ben D. Foulois, of the United States army, who has been sent with a Wright aeroplane to aid in preserving neutrality on the Mexican border, is the first army officer to become an aviator, having learned the art under the tuition of Orville Wright a couple of years ago. He was had at Fort Sam Houston the only aeroplane the government own, but he has not been flying in it. It is of the old type of Wright machines.
     He is accompanied by Phil Parmalee, in the new Wright machine loaned to the government by Robert J. Collier. This machine is capable of carrying two passengers.
     By means of powerful field glasses one of the aeronauts will be able to observe a very large territory and will keep watch on the movements of the revolutionists.
Source: Worcester Massachusetts Evening Gazette


More than 100 actual news stories appear in the February 1911 issue. Above is the list of people covered in the February 1911 edition. Individual editions are $9.95 plus postage.

Pre-Order February 1911 Edition and receive 50% off the March 1911 Edition and save shipping costs on 2nd issue.

News Samples

Jan 09 - Feb 09 - Mar 09 - Apr 09 - May 09 - Jun 09 - Jul 09 - Aug 09 - Sep 09 - Oct 09 - Nov 09 - Dec 09

Jan 10 - Feb 10 - Mar 10 - Apr 10 - May 10 - Jun 10 - Jul 10 - Aug 10 - Sep 10 - Oct 10 - Nov 10 - Dec 10

Jan 11 - Feb 11 - Mar 11 - Apr 11 - May 11 - Jun 11 - Jul 11 - Aug 11 - Sep 11 - Oct 11 - Nov 11 - Dec 11