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Sample of January 1911 News
More than 400 actual news stories appear in the January 1911 issue. Below is a sampling of the first two days of 1911. Individual editions are $9.95 plus postage. 80 pages of historic news and over 100 images, the most spectacular issue ever assembled on vintage aviation!!



January 1911 aviation news

Moisant Killed While Attempting to Land, and Hoxsey Is Victim of Fearful Fall

     Jan 1, 1911 -- John B. Moisant and Arch Hoxsey, America's foremost aviators, were killed yesterday. Moisant met his death while attempting to land in a field several miles from New Orleans at 9:55 o'clock a.m.
     Hoxsey, displaying his skill before a crowd of thousands in Los Angeles, lost control of his Wright biplane shortly after 2 o'clock p.m., and, falling several hundred feet, was dashed to death.
     Startled as was that part of the world which has watched the airmen reach farther and farther into the realm of endeavor of the birds to receive the news of Moisant's fatal drop in his 50 horsepower Bleriot machine early in the day, the later news which told of the death of Hoxsey cast a broader shadow over it.
     Moisant, who won the $10,000 prize recently in New York for circling the statue of liberty from Belmont park, defeating Grahame-White of England, was killed when his monoplane tipped "on its nose" and dropped in one swoop to the earth. The pilots neck was broken.
     Hoxsey was more than 500 feet in the air, where he had gone to better, if possible, his world's altitude record of 11,474 feet, made within the week. The rear control of his biplane evidently failed to answer to his touch, and the machine turned over several times, crashing to the earth. His death was instantaneous.
Source: San Francisco - The Call

Masson Flits at Santa Barbara

Ivy Baldwin Drops Ten Feet And Damages His Airship

[Special Dispatch to The Call]
     SANTA BARBARA, Jan 1, 1911 -- The first day of Santa Barbara's aviation meet was saved from being a grievous disappointment by the sensational flight of Masson, the Frenchman, in a Curtiss-Farman biplane. His feats more than made up for the failure of Ivy Baldwin, who, in a similar though smaller machine, made repeated efforts to get off the ground. He finally rose 10 feet and fell. Two ribs of one plane were snapped and other small damage sustained by the machine, though Baldwin was uninjured. His car was then towed ignominiously to camp just as Masson made ready for his first trails, flying a few times back and forth across the field, demonstrating complete control, the ability to rise and fall at will.
     His engine is a new type, made in Oakland and tried for the second time today. It has eight cylinders, the propeller making 1,200 revolutions a minute and a speed of over 50 miles an hour being attained.
     Masson sailed away toward the mountains. In three minutes the car was lost to sight in the shadows of distant canyons, but was located again when the afternoon sun glistening on the white rudder as the turn was made.
     Coming back at express speed, Masson landed where he started amidst the plaudits of 3,000 persons. He had traveled six miles in seven minutes and attained an altitude of 500 feet. Later he climbed to a height of 3,000 feet, describing several spirals as he descended with great rapidity, making a perfect landing.
Source: San Francisco, CA - The Call

Wright Is Reticent

     Dayton, OH., Jan. 2, 1911 -- Orville Wright today made the following statement regarding the killing of Arch Hoxsey at Los Angeles Saturday while in flight:
     "We have a telegram from our man at Los Angeles stating that the accident was caused by neither the fault of Hoxsey nor of the machine itself, but was due to the conditions prevailing during the day. Further than this, we have nothing to say at present."
Source: San Francisco, CA - The Call

Radley's Narrow Escape

Loses Control of Monoplane, but Recovers in Time to Prevent Fall.
Gives Up Aviation

     Aviation Field, Los Angeles, Cal., Jan. 2, 1911 -- James Radley, the English aviator, began the last day of the Los Angeles aviation meet with a narrow escape from death. Although the day was calm and there were no wind about the starting point in front of the grand stand, drifting gusts of wind caught the Englishman's Bleriot monoplane, and for a second or two it danced and wabbled in the air in a manner that startled the spectators.
     Radley's encounter with the air currents was unexpected. He was totally unprepared for it, but regained control of the machine and immediately landed. A few minutes later he accepted an offer from a purchaser to buy his machine. He said at the San Francisco meet that after that he might abandon the sport that had claimed so many victims.
     Glenn Curtiss ascended in one of his racers shortly after Radley went up, encountered the same dangerous air currents and was forced down. He said the bad spot in the atmosphere was located just above where Arch Hoxsey struck last Saturday.
Source: Dallas, TX - The Dallas Morning News

CURTISS WINNER OF CUP

Wins Scientific American Trophy for Three Consecutive Years in Cross-Country Flights

     New York, Jan. 2, 1911 -- Glenn H. Curtiss, the aviator, became owner of the Scientific American aeroplane cup, the first trophy of the kind offered in this country, with the close of the year 1910. Curtiss won the cup three consecutive years, which entitles him to permanent possession under the conditions of the offer. Announcements of the award was made today. The first flight in 1908, was made at Hammondsport, N.Y., after advertisement of his intention and before a committee. The second was at Mineola, L.I., just before his victory at Rheims. The award for 1910 was made for the Albany - New York flight and completed the three victories necessary.
     The cup was originally offered for an observed flight of one kilometer, but with the progress of aviation the conditions for 1910 were changed to equal the longest cross-country flight previously announced.
Source: Dallas, TX - The Dallas Morning News


More than 400 actual news stories appear in the January 1911 issue. Above is a brief sampling of the first two days of 1911. Individual editions are $9.95 plus postage. 80 pages of historic news and over 100 images, the most spectacular issue ever assembled on vintage aviation!!

News Samples

Jan 09 - Feb 09 - Mar 09 - Apr 09 - May 09 - Jun 09 - Jul 09 - Aug 09 - Sep 09 - Oct 09 - Nov 09 - Dec 09

Jan 10 - Feb 10 - Mar 10 - Apr 10 - May 10 - Jun 10 - Jul 10 - Aug 10 - Sep 10 - Oct 10 - Nov 10 - Dec 10

Jan 11 - Feb 11 - Mar 11 - Apr 11 - May 11 - Jun 11 - Jul 11 - Aug 11 - Sep 11 - Oct 11 - Nov 11 - Dec 11