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Sample of July 1910 News
More than 100 actual news stories appear in the July 1910 issue. Below is a sampling of a few days of 1910. Individual editions are $9.95 plus postage.


Aviator In 500 Foot Fall
A.R. Hoxsey, in Altitude Flight Loses Control and Drops to Ground

     Pittsburg, Kan., July 5, 1910 - After four days of successful flights here Aviator A.R. Hoxsey fell 500 feet in a Wright brothers' aeroplane to-day. He was ascending in circles in an altitude flight, the last of the meet, when the motor suddenly stopped. It took Hoxsey some time to get the aeroplane at an angle downward. When 100 feet above ground the machine veered and tipped to an angle of 60 degrees and dived swiftly to earth, wrecking the machine, with the exception of one wing and the engine. Hoxsey escaped serious injury.
Source: The Chicago Record-Herald

Aviator In River
Narrow Escape from Death of A.L. Pfitzner, at Newburyport
Massachusetts Airman Lost Control of Machine in Wind

     Newburyport, Mass July 9, 1910 - Dropping 75 feet, A.L. Pfitzner, of Hammondsport, N.Y., landed with his Burgess biplane in the Plum Island river today. He managed to disentangle himself and get ashore, severely shaken up and bruised, but was not seriously hurt. The aeroplane was wrecked.
     Pfitzner, after making two preliminary flights over Plum Island this morning at a height of about 75 feet, one for a mile and the other for three-quarters of a mile, started out for a trip to Ipswich. For the three miles between the aeroplane shed and the river he made one of the prettiest flights yet seen in New England, traveling at good speed and maintaining a height of between 75 and 100 feet.
     The biplane was directly over the river, about 75 feet in the air, when a cross current suddenly struck it. The machine tipped to one side and shot down into the water. Pfitzner was apparently beneath the engine and his mechanicians and other observers thought he had been killed. They rushed to the rescue, some of them pulling off their clothes for a plunge into the river. As they approached the river bank, however, they saw the aviator emerge from the wreckage. The tide being out, the water was shallow, but Pfitzner had to wallow thru deep mud to reach the shore. When he was safe on dry land a physician hastily examined him and found that save for a few bruises and a slight cut on his forehead and a bad shaking up Pfitzner was unhurt.
     The airman's feelings, however, were deeply wounded. When the demolished biplane had been hauled out of the river Pfitzner exclaimed: "I wish I had broken my neck with it, boys."
     He was not prepared to say whether he would make further flights here with another machine.
Source: Lewiston Evening Journal, Lewiston, ME

British Aviator Killed Yesterday and His Machine

     Chicago, Ill - July 13, 1910 - Charles Stewart Rolls, who was killed yesterday in a flying tournament at Bournemouth, England, his machine falling suddenly when 100 feet high, was the foremost of British aviators. He caused a sensation by flying from Dover to Calais and back without alighting on French soil, June 2, last. As a balloonist he made more than 150 ascensions and gained the French Aero Club's medal for the longest balloon journey. In his youth he was one of the pioneers in automobiling in England, and he was highly popular all-around sportsman. Rolls was born Aug. 27, 1877, and was the youngest son of Lord Llangattock. He was educated at Cambridge, and took a course in engineering, after which he became managing director of Rolls-Royce, Limited, motor car manufacturers.
Source: The Chicago Record-Herald

The Aeroplane Lawyer
His Coming Inevitable in Present Volume of Litigation

     Washington, DC July 21, 1910 - In the development of the professions marching on with progress of invention, the aeroplane lawyer is about to appear. At the present rate of productivity in aeronautics, the volume of litigation will be incalculable. There are now more than 140 applications for patents relating to automatic balance for air craft and hundreds of patents for motors, aeroplanes, propellers, skids and other essentials.
     "From the present outlook" a patent lawyer said here today, "we will soon have in this country a new crop of aeroplane lawyers, who specialize in the law of the air, who will keep track of the aeroplane patents."
Source: Lewiston Evening Journal, Lewiston, ME

Aeroplane Wrecked
Aviator Seymour Luckily Escaped Injury at Hempstead Plains, N.Y.

     New York, NY July 27, 1910 - While trying out a new engine in his aeroplane on the aviation course at Hempstead Plains to-day, Joseph Seymour, the aviator, came to grief at what is known as the "graveyard Hallow" a depression where experience has shown the downward suction of the wind to be exceptionally strong. Seymour was flying low when the aeroplane felt the downward pull and the machine dropped sharply, hitting the ground with considerable force. Two wheels of the running gear were smashed, the ribs of the lower main plane splintered and the propeller broken.
     Altho the aviator was traveling at the rate of 45 miles an hour when the accident occurred, he luckily escaped injury. The machine will be laid up some time for repairs.
Source: Lewiston Evening Journal, Lewiston, ME


More than 100 actual news stories appear in the July 1910 issue. Above is a sampling of a few days of 1910. Individual editions are $9.95 plus postage.

News Samples

Jan 09 - Feb 09 - Mar 09 - Apr 09 - May 09 - Jun 09 - Jul 09 - Aug 09 - Sep 09 - Oct 09 - Nov 09 - Dec 09

Jan 10 - Feb 10 - Mar 10 - Apr 10 - May 10 - Jun 10 - Jul 10 - Aug 10 - Sep 10 - Oct 10 - Nov 10 - Dec 10

Jan 11 - Feb 11 - Mar 11 - Apr 11 - May 11 - Jun 11 - Jul 11 - Aug 11 - Sep 11 - Oct 11 - Nov 11 - Dec 11