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Sample of October 1910 News

More than 100 actual news stories appear in the October 1910 issue. Below is a sampling of a few days of 1910. Individual editions are $9.95 plus postage.


Aviators Arrive Here Next Week
Curtiss and Others Will Come to Prepare Field for Centennial Meet
Dover Township to Have One Day for Its Anniversary

     Cleveland, OH, Oct 1, 1910 - Glenn Curtiss, who will be the big attraction at the aviation meet to be held during the Cuyahoga county centennial, will arrive in Cleveland Monday morning to look over the aviation field on the lake front. Immediately after the visit of the aviator work of preparing the field for the meet will be started.
     A successful meet is assured by the men behind the project. Curtiss, Mars, Ely and Post will be here during the week, and it will be guaranteed that three machines will be in active service all the time, although the aviators will not be in the city simultaneously.
     There probably will be twenty-five events on the program, including a ten-mile race, half-mile race, exhibition flights by all the aviators, bomb throwing trials, speed, accuracy, fast climbing, gliding, slow flying, quick starting and altitude contests.
     There will be no fixed program for each day as the different flights depend entirely upon the weather. Each contest will bear a number in the program and a large board will be in the center of the field upon which will be displayed the number of the event to be tried.
     Grahame-White, the English aviator, will not take part in the meet, but efforts are being made to secure other entrants as most of the aviators who will take part use Curtiss machines.
     Interest in the centennial celebration is growing throughout the country. On Oct. 10 Dover township will celebrate its 100th anniversary. The town was settled by the Cahoon family and the three daughters of the late Joel B. Cahoon, who still reside in the township, have been sent out invitations for the event.
     The celebration will be held at Rose Hill on the lake shore, west, the original place of settlement. On Oct 9 at 3 in the afternoon there will be historical services at the First M.E. church, stop 32, Lake Shore Electric line.
Source: Cleveland Plain Dealer

Flying to Record, Man's Lost In Sky
Aviator Soars From Springfield to St. Louis, Going Astray in City Smoke
Second Bird Man Sails Away to Guide Wanderer to Earth

     St. Louis, MO Oct 8, 1910 - Arch Hoxsey, in a Wright biplane, flew from Springfield, Ill., to the Country club grounds at Clayton, St. Louis county, today, and established an American sustained flight record in an aeroplane by covering 104 miles. The distance was estimated by Hoxsey.
     His objective landing place was the aviation field at Kinlcoh park, but because of failing to find the grounds, he descended five miles away. He alighted on the aviation field at 3 p.m. His time in the air was 3 hours and 22 minutes. For fity-seven minutes Hoxsey tired to find the field and circled within three miles of it five times. His engine could be heard when he was not in sight. He mistook the smoke of a brick plant for the tar fire on the field and could not locate the field.
     Soon after leaving Springfield at 11:55 o'clock this morning, he maintained an altitude of 600 feet until wind gusts forced him to rise 600 feet higher. He flew in the 1,200 feet level the remained of the trip. A special train which was to guide him to St. Louis was thirty minutes late in leaving Springfield and Hoxsey never saw it. At Carlinville he left the Chicago & Alton right-of-way and followed the interurban tracks to Staunton, his birthplace. He circle the the town twice and then headed toward the Mississippi river.
     After reaching Alton he turned south and crossed the Mississippi where the Missouri river empties into it. He then began to search for the aviation field. He was seen from the aviation field at 2:14.
     As soon as Walter Brookins could get an aeroplane started he went aloft to guide his fellow birdman to the field, but Hoxsey veered to the south and was lost to view. Bombs exploded and the band played as loudly as possible, but the aviator did not hear the guiding noises. He landed at the Country club, five miles from the field, at 3:11. After he learned the direction of the aviation field he went to the air again and landed safely.
     The flight was the opening event of a ten-day meet under the auspices of the Aero Club of St. Louis. Brookins, Turpin and Welsh entertained the spectators with flights while waiting the arrival of Hoxsey. Brookins went up more than 2,000 feet and glided to the ground. Alec Ogilive was in the air for seventeen minutes and each of the aviators dropped bombs on a battleship model. Alfred LeBlanc will arrive Monday to participate in the meeting. His Bleriot monoplane is on the field.
Source: Cleveland Plain Dealer

May Fly For Big Prize
Wrights Indicate Willingness to Soar Above washington, Providing Inducement is Offered

     Washington, D.C. Oct 15, 1910 - The Wright brothers are willing to go after a $10,000 prize for an aero flight from Washington to Baltimore and return of for a record flight of over 104 miles made about Washington, it is believed. A dispatch was recieved in Washington today from Thomas H. Jackson, representative of the Wrights now in St. Louis, asking whether a prize of $10,000 had been offered for such a flight.
     Since Claude Grahame-White has found that it will be impossible for him to attempt such a flight owing to accidents to his aeroplanes at Bennings yesterday, it is possible that the Wrights may make the attempt for a record, or send one of their best operators, Brookins or Johnstone - to make the effort in a Wright machine.
     If the offer of the prize for such a flight is renewed the Wrights will probably go after it.
Source: Cleveland Plain Dealer

Thousands Want To Fly
All Request Aviator Hoxsey, Who Carried Roosevelt as Passenger, to Take Them Skyward

     St. Louis, MO. Oct 15, 1910 - When Col. Theodore Roosevelt made a flight in an aeroplane with Aviator Arch Hoxsey here last Tuesday he aroused much interest throughout the country in the subject of aerial navigation.
     From all parts of the country evidence of earnest wishes to sail skyward after the manner of the former president have been forthcoming in every mail reaching St. Louis since Tuesday.
     Fully 3,000 persons have written urgent letters requesting that they be accorded opportunities to "fly with Hoxsey, the man who took the former president up in the air."
Source: Cleveland Plain Dealer


More than 100 actual news stories appear in the October 1910 issue. Above is a sampling of a few days of 1910. Individual editions are $9.95 plus postage.

News Samples

Jan 09 - Feb 09 - Mar 09 - Apr 09 - May 09 - Jun 09 - Jul 09 - Aug 09 - Sep 09 - Oct 09 - Nov 09 - Dec 09

Jan 10 - Feb 10 - Mar 10 - Apr 10 - May 10 - Jun 10 - Jul 10 - Aug 10 - Sep 10 - Oct 10 - Nov 10 - Dec 10

Jan 11 - Feb 11 - Mar 11 - Apr 11 - May 11 - Jun 11 - Jul 11 - Aug 11 - Sep 11 - Oct 11 - Nov 11 - Dec 11