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Sample of September 1909 News

More than 100 actual news stories appear in the September 1909 issue. Below is a sampling of a few days of 1909. Individual editions are $9.95 plus postage.


Balloon Rises 12,000 Feet

     Dayton, Oh. - Sept. 1, 1909 - The new balloon "The Delight" in its initial voyage yesterday reached a height of 12,000 feet. It landed fourteen miles beyond Delaware Ohio.
Source: Brooklyn Daily Eagle, Brooklyn, NY

Aeroplanist Killed
Louis Raynaud, an Inventor, Struck by a Railroad Train at New Orleans

     New Orleans, La. - Sept. 1, 1909 - Louis Raynaud, the inventor of an airship which was to have been given its initial flight Sunday, and a party of three others, returning home in a wagon from a day's work on the aeroplane, was struck by a New Orleans and Great Northern passenger train at Gentilly Road and Bruxelles Street here last night. Raynaud died shortly after being taken to the Charity Hospital. Two of his companions were slightly injured.
     The invention of Raynaud had been kept a secret until a short time ago. Since then it had been the object of much interest and great things were expected of it. The machine is one of the bi-plane order, differing from the Wright brothers aeroplane only in that it has a long tail which, it is claimed, would make it more steady. It was to have carried two or three passengers.
     Eugene Raynaud, a brother of the dead inventor, said last night that he and other members of the family would probably make the final preparation for the flight, which, however, will be delayed for several days.
Source: Brooklyn Daily Eagle, Brooklyn, NY

Offers to Aviators
Washington Wants the Contest to Take Place There Next Year

     Washington, D.C. - Sept. 2, 1909 - An attempt is made by the local chamber of commerce to have the Aero Club of America hold its next aviation meet in this city. A committee has been appointed to get in touch with the army officers interested in aeronautics to figure out the cost and other details connected with bringing the meet here.
     Owing to the fact that Glenn H. Curtiss won the Gordon Bennett Cup at Rheims, France, the next international meet of aeronauts will be held in this country. The trails are to take place some time between May 25 and November 15 of next year, but no definite day has been fixed.
     A cablegram was dispatched to Mr. Curtiss to-day asking that he use his efforts towards bringing the event here. Working with the local chamber of commerce in its efforts is the Washington Aero Club, of which Thomas F. Welsh, the Colorado mine owner, is president.
     One of the local newspapers will give a handsome prize for the aviation trials if they are held at or near Washington.
Source: Brooklyn Daily Eagle, Brooklyn, NY

Boy Caught By Balloon
Is Whirled in Air at End of Rope

     Syracuse, Ind. - Sept 3, 1909 - Carried 3,000 feet into the air, and whirled around with the speed of a locomotive, when his body became entangled in the ropes of Wm. Simmons' balloon, little Quinter Neff, 12, is recovering from the effects of his perilous aerial journey.
     Wednesday, with hundreds of other boys, Quinter was intently watching the preparations for Simmons' flight.
     Instead of heeding the warning of the balloonist to stand back, Neff and his companions pushed closer to the big bag. Quinter, in his eagerness not to miss any feature of the flight, had pressed too close to the bag and in some way his little body became entangled in the ropes.
     The first inkling Simmons had that all was not right was when he heard a cry of horror coming up from the thousands of spectators. Peering over the edge of the balloon basket, Simmons saw the body of little Quinter dangling from one of the ropes.
     As the balloon shot upward, gaining momentum, the boy's body began to revolve and the boy was whirled around at the rate of an express engine wheel.
     The balloon began to descend and as it neared the ground it was noticed that the boy had drawn the rope tightly around him. When it was observed that the lad was in no danger, a cheer went up from the earth and a hundred willing hands were outstretched to break Quinter's fall. His little form was cut loose from the ropes, who hurried him to a hospital where it was said that the lad was only suffering from shock and would be entirely recovered in a few days.
Source: Long Beach Daily Telegram, Long Beach, CA

Aviator's Queer Mishap
Rudder Caught in Telegraph Wires and Engine Smoke Blinded Him

     Grand Rapids, Mich - Sept 17, 1909 - Suspended from the telegraph wires over a railroad track, while a passenger train thundered beneath him, was the thrilling experience of Lincoln Beachey, aeronaut, in his airship, yesterday afternoon. The aviator ascended from the fair grounds and while maneuvering over the grounds tried to cross the railroad tracks. He was too low and the rudder caught in the telegraph wires.
     The smoke and cinders from the engine almost blinded Beachey and he had great difficulty in keeping his seat on the frail craft. After the train passed he was taken from his precarious position. The airship was badly damaged.
Source: Brooklyn Daily Eagle, Brooklyn, NY

Circles Statue
Aeroplane Goes Around Statue Of Liberty, Thrilling Crowds

     New York, N.Y. - Sept. 29, 1909 - Darting through the air at terrific speed, with the ease and grace of a seagull, Wilbur Wright today gave the throngs of his countrymen assembled here a rare display of aviation and for the first time New York saw this man, whose conquest of the air has won the acclaim of all the crowns of the world, sail the craft that has led the way in aerial navigation.
     The craft as it lifted itself into the air was visible from all of downtown Manhattan, where the windows of the towering office buildings were crowded. It could be seen from Jersey City and along the Jersey shore. From the Brooklyn side it was equally well in view and all along the north shore of Staten Island crowds watched the modern day marvel.
     It was the second flight of the morning, for Wright and his machine was in perfect trim.
     He was the first of the aviators here to attempt to circle the Statute of Liberty.
     In Wright's first flight at 9 o'clock he flew close to the Goddess, but did not encircle, as he was getting control and observations before making the main attempt. When he turned back and brought the machine to the starting point on Governor's Island there was disappointment throughout the crowd and most every one believed that he had been unable to accomplish the feat.
     At 10:18 o'clock, however, the aeroplane arose again. This time it was under terrific power, the motor working perfectly. With increasing speed, until a velocity was maintained that held the spectators breathless and in awe, the aeroplane darted in the direction of the statue.
Source: Long Beach Daily Telegram, Long Beach, CA


More than 100 actual news stories appear in the September 1909 issue. Above is a sampling of a few days of 1909. Individual editions are $9.95 plus postage.

News Samples

Jan 09 - Feb 09 - Mar 09 - Apr 09 - May 09 - Jun 09 - Jul 09 - Aug 09 - Sep 09 - Oct 09 - Nov 09 - Dec 09

Jan 10 - Feb 10 - Mar 10 - Apr 10 - May 10 - Jun 10 - Jul 10 - Aug 10 - Sep 10 - Oct 10 - Nov 10 - Dec 10

Jan 11 - Feb 11 - Mar 11 - Apr 11 - May 11 - Jun 11 - Jul 11 - Aug 11 - Sep 11 - Oct 11 - Nov 11 - Dec 11