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Sample of September 1910 News

More than 100 actual news stories appear in the September 1910 issue. Below is a sampling of a few days of 1910. Individual editions are $9.95 plus postage.


Zeppelin Loses His Fifth Airship
Count Suffers New Disaster When Flames Destroy Great Dirigible
Stern Motor Explodes While Crew Places Big Bag in Shed

     Baden-Baden - Sept. 14, 1910 - If anything could discourage that intrepid apostle of aerostatics, Count Zeppelin, it would appear to have been furnished today when the Zeppelin VI., the latest model of his aerial invention, was destroyed by fire following the explosion of one of the three motors located in the stern gondola.
     Three of the airship's crew were seriously injured. The accident happened as the dirigible was being put into her shed here. The defective motor had been operating as usual when suddenly the crew whirled from their posts in the rear gondola as the craft trembled and lurched. There was a sharp report, a flash of flame, and in a moment the immense fabric of silk canvas was afire.
     The crew, hardly realizing what has happened, tumbled over the sides of the airship, barely escaping with their lives. The fire spread so rapidly that the shed was soon destroyed.
     This is the fifth serious accident which has befallen the Zeppelin dirigibles, the histories of which have been brilliant, but brief and usually ending in disaster.
     The Zeppelin VI was under charter of the Passenger Airship Co., having replaced in the passenger service the recently wrecked Deutschland. She was the speediest of her type and could maintain a speed of thirty-eight miles an hour. The dirigible was reconstructed to carry ten passengers and during the last few days had made trip to various interesting paces. Many Americans were among the excursions.
Source: The Cleveland Plain Dealer

Strain Of Flying Injurious To Man
Constant Defiance of Death Forces Famous Bird Men to Quit Game Early
Willing to Let Younger Pilots Take Chances After a Few Years

     Rome, Sept. 17, 1910 - M. Emile Dubonnet, the French airman, is about to give up flying. His retirement supports the contentions of more than one medical authority that the nerve strain of frequent flying is so great that it forces a man to abandon active airmanship in an extraordinary short space of time.
     Many airmen admit that this is so, and the is remarkable proof of it in the fact that, although airmanship is in its infancy, the early pioneers are already vanishing and new champions taking their place. The following pioneers have already retired from active flying in public:

  • M. Paulhan - Intends to devote himself almost entirely to construction work.
  • M. Bleriot - has given up all except experimental flying with new machines of his own invention.
  • Henry Farman - Has abandoned flying save fro trials with newly designed machines.
  • Wright brothers - Fly very rarely, being most concerned with constructional work.
  • M. Rougier - Retired after a bad fall in the sea at Nice.
  • M. Fournier - Ceased to fly after a number of falls.
  • M. Duray - Forced to give up flying after being badly injured by a blow from his propeller.
  • Mr. Moore-Brabazon - Has relinquished flying at meetings.
  • Mr. Cockburn - Will do no more exhibition flying.
  • Mr. Gibbs - Compelled to retire temporarily as the result of a heavy fall at Wolverhampton.
  • Capt. Dickson - Does not expect to fly at meetings after this season.
  • Glenn H. Curtiss - Has very largely relinquished flying in favor of construction.
  • M. Sommer - Has become a constructor and rarely flies.
  • Mr. Rawlinson - Obliged to discontinue flying after his accident at Bournemouth.
  • Mortimer Singer - After a fall at Heliopolis last season, has not flown again.

     Mr. Grahame-White thus describes the nerve strain of flying: "It is the tension of fearing that something unexpected may happen - that the engine may fail, that a stay may break, that a controlling wire may snap. Any of these things may, one knows quite well, bring about a fearful fall. The rush of air, and the fact that one is high above the ground, has very little to do with the ordeal."
     "Experience already proves," was the comment yesterday of an international authority, "that flying will become far more easy; aeroplanes are on the eve of enormous development so far as reliability is concerned."
Source: The Cleveland Plain Dealer

To Make Record Flight
Brookins Will Attempt to Drive Aeroplane From Chicago to Springfield, Ill.

     Chicago, Ill. Sept 24, 1910 - Walter R. Brookins, aviator, will attempt a flight with a Wright brothers aeroplane from Chicago to Springfield, Ill., next Thursday in an effort to win a $10,000 purse offered by the Chicago Record-Herald for such a feat.
     Brookins will make preliminary trials on the lake front on Tuesday and Wednesday, when he will attempt flights across the downtown district and also out some distance above Lake Michigan.
     The start of the 190-mile attempted flight from Chicago to Springfield will be made by Brookins from Washington Park, on the south side. The aviator will, if successful in making the long flight, try to land in the fair grounds at the state capitol.
Source: The Chicago Record-Herald


More than 100 actual news stories appear in the September 1910 issue. Above is a sampling of a few days of 1910. Individual editions are $9.95 plus postage.

News Samples

Jan 09 - Feb 09 - Mar 09 - Apr 09 - May 09 - Jun 09 - Jul 09 - Aug 09 - Sep 09 - Oct 09 - Nov 09 - Dec 09

Jan 10 - Feb 10 - Mar 10 - Apr 10 - May 10 - Jun 10 - Jul 10 - Aug 10 - Sep 10 - Oct 10 - Nov 10 - Dec 10

Jan 11 - Feb 11 - Mar 11 - Apr 11 - May 11 - Jun 11 - Jul 11 - Aug 11 - Sep 11 - Oct 11 - Nov 11 - Dec 11